Hitting a milestone in fashion – How I Met Your Mothers 100th.

Every show likes to do something outrageous, special and sometimes spectacular for their 100th episode. How I Met Your Mother did all of them and more. The multi-camera sitcom that plays like a single-camera one showed off with its two strongest aspects, the mystery of The Mother with the “mythology” built up around her (student in that other class, the Yellow Umbrella) and Barney Stinson’s two key aspects – his ability to be a womanizer and his human-like adoration of suits – and they flowed together with almost perfection.

Barney wanted to bang the girl behind the bar, and Robin proved that she’s only incredibly hot purely because she’s behind the bar. What made this woman a particular hardship for Barney was her hatred of suits. Barney not being in a suit with Hans without Chewy. They need one another, and Barney struggles to survive without his suit on. Barney has to make the decision, in the form of a fantastic musical song, adequately titled “Nothing Fits Me Like A Suit” that suits are indeed, a huge aspect of his life. Marshall, Ted, Lilly and even Robin try to tempt him otherwise, with a huge song climax, in which we presume Barney has picked the suits. He didn’t, however. Getting laid is just that bit more important.

As for The Mother’s storyline, Ted meets the immaculate Rachel Bilson playing Cindy, who we assume to actually be the mother. Until we learn she has a room-mate, and all the things Ted loves about her are actually her room-mates. With the help of his future-voice, we know she is not the mother, but Ted was literally so close to her to the actual mother it was unbearably awesome. We saw her God-damn heel…

As Slap Bet is as quintessential to the lore of How I Met Your Mother as ever, I’d actually put its 100th above that. ‘Girls VS Suits’ had a lot to live up to. The hype and the expectations were crazy high, and its a testament to how strong the comedy is in its fifth year that it’s actually produced its best 20 minutes in a long time, practically ever.